Partisan Media, Polarized Audiences? A Qualitative Analysis of Online Political News and Responses in the United States, U.K., and The Netherlands

New publication by Michael Hameleers in International Journal of Public Opinion Research, titled: ‘Partisan Media, Polarized Audiences? A Qualitative Analysis of Online Political News and Responses in the United States, U.K., and The Netherlands’. Click here for the article. Abstract: Media outlets in the United States are frequently accused of articulating partisan biases in political reporting. In Europe, the media…

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Spiraling downward: The reciprocal relation between attitude toward political behavioral targeting and privacy concerns

New publication by Tom Dobber, Damian Trilling, Natali Helberger, and Claes de Vreese in New Media & Society, titled: ‘Spiraling downward: The reciprocal relation between attitude toward political behavioral targeting and privacy concerns’. Click here for the article. Abstract: Tailored political messages are increasingly prevalent in election time, but we know little about how people perceive such data-driven and…

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Knowing is not loving: media effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward the EU

New publication by Franziska Marquart, Andreas Goldberg, Erika van Elsas, Anna Brosius, and Claes de Vreese in Journal of European Integration, titled: ‘Knowing is not loving: media effects on knowledge about and attitudes toward the EU’. Click here for the article. Abstract: Media provide the public with information related to the European Union which may alter individuals’ perceptions, ultimately…

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The Persuasive Power of Protest. How Protest wins Public Support

New publication by Ruud Wouters in Social Forces, titled “The Persuasive Power of Protest. How Protest wins Public Support”. Click here for article. Abstract: How do protest actions succeed in winning public support? In this paper, I theorize how features of protest can persuade citizens to support demonstrators. In particular, I argue that broadcasting an attractive collective identity by…

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Going Negative, Worldwide

Alex Nai has a new publication in “Government & Opposition” titled “Going Negative, Worldwide: Towards a General Understanding of Determinants and Targets of Negative Campaigning”.   Read the abstract here: Little comparative evidence exists about what causes candidates to use negative campaigning in elections. We introduce an original comparative data set that contains experts’ information about campaigning strategies of 172…

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Augmenting polarization via social media?

New publication by Michael Hameleers in Acta Politica, titled “Augmenting polarization via social media? A comparative analysis of Trump’s and Wilders’ online populist communication and the electorate’s interpretations surrounding the elections”. Abstract: Social network sites may have contributed to the global electoral success of populism in important ways. Drawing on the technological affordances of social media, politicians are enabled to…

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Exploring Motivations for Online Privacy Protection Behavior: Insights from Panel Data.

New publication by Sanne Kruikemeier and colleagues in Communication Research, titled “Exploring Motivations for Online Privacy Protection Behavior: Insights from Panel Data” Abstract: Personally managing and protecting online privacy has become an essential part of everyday life. This research draws on the protection motivation theory (PMT) to investigate privacy protective behavior online. A two-wave panel study (N = 928) shows…

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Patterns of intra-election volatility.

New publication by Sabine Geers and Jesper Stromback in Journal of Elections, Public Opinion and Parties. Read the abstract below: One key trend changing political environments across advanced industrial democracies is increasing electoral volatility. Despite extensive research, at the individual level we still know relatively little about the mechanisms behind electoral volatility during election campaigns, including the impact of political…

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Augmenting polarization via social media? A comparative analysis of Trump’s and Wilders’ online populist communication and the electorate’s interpretations surrounding the elections.

New publication by Michael Hameleers in Acta Politica, titled “Augmenting polarization via social media? A comparative analysis of Trump’s and Wilders’ online populist communication and the electorate’s interpretations surrounding the elections”. Read the article here. Abstract: Social network sites may have contributed to the global electoral success of populism in important ways. Drawing on the technological affordances of social media,…

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Online and Newsworthy: Have Online Sources Changed Journalism?

New publication by Sarah van Leuven, Sanne Kruikemeier, Sophie Lecheler en Liesbeth Hermans in Digital Journalism , titled “Online and Newsworthy: Have Online Sources Changed Journalism?” Read the article here. Abstract: This special issue takes up the issue of online journalistic news sourcing techniques, which are defined as the use of the internet for gathering information for news stories. Online platforms, such…

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