News consumption and its unpleasant side effect

New publication by Mark Boukes and Rens Vliegenthart in Journal of Media Psychology. Read the abstract below.   Following the news is generally understood to be crucial for democracy as it allows citizens to politically participate in an informed manner; yet, one may wonder about the unintended side effects it has for the mental well-being of citizens. With news…

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Genuine effects of vote advice applications on party choice: Filtering out factors that affect both the advice obtained and the vote

Previous research shows effects of the advice from voting advice applications (VAAs) on party choice. These effects could be spurious because of common origins of the obtained advice and party choice in antecedent factors like prior voting, issue voting and campaign effects. Here three-wave panel surveys and media content data for the Dutch national election campaigns of 2010 and…

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Online behavioral advertising: A literature review and research agenda

Advertisers are increasingly monitoring people’s online behavior and using the information collected to show people individually targeted advertisements. This phenomenon is called online behavioral advertising (OBA). Although advertisers can benefit from OBA, the practice also raises concerns about privacy. Therefore, OBA has received much attention from advertisers, consumers, policymakers, and scholars. Despite this attention, there is neither a strong…

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How established parties reduce other parties’ electoral support: The strategy of parroting the pariah

In every democracy, established political parties are challenged by other parties. Established parties react in various ways to other parties’ presence. A key hypothesis in the relevant literature is that established parties can decrease another party’s electoral support by parroting it, i.e. adopting its core policy issue position. This article argues, and demonstrates empirically, that this hypothesised effect mainly…

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The role of candidate evaluations in the 2014 European Parliament elections: Towards the personalization of voting behaviour?

We study the personalization of voting behaviour in European Parliament elections. We argue that information from the media is crucial for providing linkages between candidates and voters. Moreover, we contend that candidates can serve as information short-cuts given the complexity of European Union politics. We use a four-wave Dutch panel survey and a media study that enable us to…

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Political relevance in the eye of the beholder: Determining the substantiveness of TV shows and political debates with Twitter data

Addressing the call to move beyond a simple genre classification of TV shows as either substantive (hard) news or non-substantive (soft) infotainment, we propose using social media reactions to determine a program’s political relevance. Such an approach provides information that goes beyond genre or content characteristics and reflects what really reaches an audience. Analyzing tweets about two Dutch talk…

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